Repattern Your WingChun

The question is not what you look at, but what you see.

— Henry David Thoreau


The time is now. Life has its ups and downs, its highs and lows. Things start and end, people come and go. But there is an eternal constant, which is the chance to change.

That means no matter how hard or bad the moment is, there is always a way to keep going, to keep growing. We can dig down into our own inner resources to survive. But to thrive, allies really help.

These can be your family or friends. On the martial path, they are your students, colleagues, and teachers. Without them, we cannot get far. With their support, our path towards mastery can endure with fun, progress, and meaning. They reflect parts of ourselves we need to look at, including our very thoughts. Continue reading

WingChun Technique or Technology

The system of nature, of which man is a part, tends to be self-balancing, self-adjusting, self-cleansing. Not so with technology.

— E. F. Schumacher


Occasionally I get emails from all over this Earth asking me about WingChun technique. These inquiries hail from India, Jamaica, the Philippines, Canada, Australia, Taiwan, Germany, and many more countries, let alone numerous cities throughout the United States.

That is the beauty of the so-called World Wide Web. I enjoy hearing from my readers and fans wherever on the planet they are. In appreciation for them reaching out, I always do my best to answer their questions.

Increasingly, I receive requests for online training. Unfortunately, I have to decline them. Perhaps I am conservative but I don’t feel like it is possible to responsibly pass on our teachings without being in the presence of my students.

I agree that some knowledge may be transmitted via the internet. But there is so much that cannot be absorbed. First and foremost is the utter lack of tactile feedback. You must feel, rather than just see, or hear how WingChun works.

That is an easily forgotten side effect of online communication. We fall into the seductive illusion that it is a suitable or sufficient substitute for direct relationship. But it is far from it. Continue reading

The Function of Form

WingChunManWuI’m going to discuss a method of WingChun training which we call Form. There are four Forms in our system, each with its own range and quality of movement. The first Form, Siu Nim Tau, focuses your intention and power into a single technique. The second Form, Tsum Kiu, coordinates all four limbs into asymmetrical combinations. The third Form, Biu Jee, teaches torso dynamics. The fourth Form, Mok Yan Jang, increases the synergy of your whole body. These are generalities but give you an idea of our Form objectives. Continue reading

5 Techniques to Improve Your Technique

High-Tech Arm.

Technique is your basis in WingChun. By technique I mean the accuracy, efficacy and quality of your movements. It displays as being clear in your intention and clean in your action. This depends on right knowledge and ample practice.

If you are swimming, precise technique allows you to glide faster and longer through the water. Swinging a high-tech titanium bat lets you hit harder and farther than a wooden one. In Self-Defense, poor technique decreases the likelihood and increases the difficulty of successful application, which is dangerous in a survival context. Such sloppiness is often due to forcing and rushing. You can amplify, rather than substitute, technique with power and speed.

There are consequential visual, tactile and, especially, functional differences between merely good and extremely great technical performance. How do you hone the latter? Here are several suggestions I’d like to share with you: Continue reading